Academic Misconduct

Academic misconduct is behaviour that erodes the basis of mutual trust on which scholarly exchanges commonly rest, undermines the University's exercise of its responsibility to evaluate students' academic achievements, or restricts the University's ability to accomplish its learning objectives.

The University takes a serious view of academic misconduct and will severely penalize students, faculty and staff who are found guilty of offences associated with misappropriation of others' work, misrepresentation of personal performance and fraud, improper access to scholarly resources, and obstructing others in pursuit of their academic endeavours. In addition to this policy, the University has adopted a number of policies that govern such offences, including the Responsible Conduct of Research https://uoguelph.civicweb.net/Documents/DocumentList.aspx?ID=101475 and the Policy on Non-academic Misconduct https://www.uoguelph.ca/secretariat/office-services-student-judicial-services-non-academic-appeals/policy-non-academic-misconduct. These policies will be strictly enforced. See Chapter I Statement of Students’ Academic Responsibilities for additional information.

It is the responsibility of the University, its faculty, students and staff to be aware of what constitutes academic misconduct and to do as much as possible through establishment and use of policies and preventive procedures to limit the likelihood of offences occurring. Furthermore, individual members of the University community have the specific responsibility of initiating appropriate action in all instances where academic misconduct is believed to have taken place. This responsibility includes reporting such offences when they occur and making one's disapproval of such behaviour obvious.

University of Guelph students have the responsibility of abiding by the University's policy on academic misconduct regardless of their location of study; faculty, staff and students have the responsibility of supporting an environment that discourages misconduct. Students should also be aware that if they find their academic performance affected by medical, psychological or compassionate circumstances, they should inform the appropriate individuals (instructors, program counsellors, graduate advisors) and follow the available procedures for academic consideration outlined in the University's calendars.

Education and Remediation

Education and remediation are key to promoting an environment in which academic integrity will flourish. It should not be possible for a student to claim that they were not warned about the University's academic misconduct regulations, what constitutes academic misconduct and the potential consequences of transgressing. The need to educate students about academic integrity places a particular responsibility on faculty, especially with respect to discipline-specific issues.

The University's Strategic Directions place high value on collaboration and co-operation in the learning process, across disciplines and between institutions. Further, the strategic plan recognizes the importance of students learning to work with others in group projects and situations as key to developing skills as self-reliant learners. This is reflected in the large number of courses at this University which involve group work and encourage co-operation in completing assignments. However, there may be need to limit the amount of collaboration or co-operation. Students need to be aware of, and instructors need to be clear about assignments for which discussing or completing the work with others is not appropriate and where the expectation is that students will work separately. Instructors should be very explicit about expectations with respect to academic integrity, and information with respect to academic misconduct should be presented to students as part of the course outline, academic program orientation materials and other materials posted and distributed to students. Students need to remain aware that instructors have access to and the right to use electronic and other means of detection.

In addition, in the case of examinations, students should be sure that they read and understand the regulations with respect to conduct in examinations printed on the cover of each examination booklet, and should pay particular attention to any additional instructions from the examination invigilators.

In support of remediation, students convicted of an academic offence may be required to successfully complete an academic integrity remediation process.

Note: In this policy, the word "dean" means "dean or designated associate dean." The word "chair" means "chair of a department or director of a school." The word "department" means "department or school."

Offences

Academic misconduct is broadly understood to mean offences against the academic integrity of the learning environment.

Below are descriptions of academic offences. It is important to note that, while the University has attempted to present as comprehensive a list as possible, this list of potential academic offences should not be considered exhaustive. Students are responsible for knowing what constitutes an academic offence and faculty members have a responsibility to provide students, early in their course or program, with information about academic integrity that might be particular to their discipline. An offence may be deemed to have been committed whether the student knew a particular action was an offence or ought reasonably to have known. Whether or not a student intended to commit academic misconduct is not relevant for a finding of guilt. Hurried or careless submission of assignments does not excuse students from responsibility for verifying the academic integrity of their work before submitting it. Students who are in any doubt as to whether an action on their part could be construed as an academic offence should consult with a faculty member or faculty advisor.

It is the responsibility of students working in a group to take all reasonable steps to ensure that work submitted to the group by individual members has not been completed in a way that violates this policy.

Further, as some academic offences may also be viewed as violations of policies on the Responsible Conduct of Research, the Policy on Non-Academic Misconduct, the criminal code and/or civil statutes, students may also be subject to procedures and penalties outlined in those policies at the University’s discretion, and to criminal prosecution or civil action.

A graduate of the University may be charged with an academic offence committed while they were a registered student when, in the opinion of the dean, the offense, if detected, would have resulted in a sanction sufficiently severe that the degree would not have been granted at the time that it was.

1. Misappropriation of Other's Work

  1. Plagiarism
    Plagiarism is misrepresenting the ideas, expression of ideas or work of others as one's own. It includes reproducing or paraphrasing portions of someone else's published or unpublished material, regardless of the source, and representing these as one's own thinking by not acknowledging the appropriate source or by the failure to use appropriate quotation marks. In addition to books, articles, papers and other written works, material may include (but is not limited to): literary compositions and phrases, performance compositions, chemical compounds, art works, laboratory reports, research results, calculations and the results of calculations, diagrams, constructions, computer reports, computer code/software, and material on the internet. Some examples of plagiarism include:
    • submission of a take-home examination, essay, laboratory report or other assignment written, in whole or in part, by someone else;
    • using direct, verbatim quotations, paraphrased material, algorithms, formulae, scientific or mathematical concepts, or ideas without appropriate acknowledgment in any academic assignment;
    • using another’s data or research findings;
    • buying or selling term papers or assignments;
    • submitting a computer program developed in whole or in part by someone else, with or without modifications, as one’s own;
    Students have the responsibility to learn and use the conventions of documentation suitable to the discipline, and are encouraged to consult with the instructor of the course, the academic supervisor, or the department chair for clarification if needed. Instructors should include in the materials they provide to students about academic integrity, information about any unique, discipline-specific understandings with respect to what must be acknowledged or cited1.
  2. Copying
    Copying is similar to plagiarism in that it involves the appropriation of others' work as one's own. It includes copying in whole or in part another's test or examination answer(s), laboratory report, essay, or other assignment.
    Copying also includes submitting the same work, research or assignment for credit on more than one occasion in two or more courses, or in the same course, without the prior written permission of the instructor(s) in all courses involved (including courses taken at other post-secondary institutions).
  3. Unauthorized Co-operation or Collaboration
    It is an offence to co-operate or collaborate in the completion of an academic assignment, in whole or in part, when the instructor has indicated that the assignment is to be completed on an individual basis.
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In addition to being concerned about appropriate citation, students who wish to use the work of others, from any source, should be aware of copyright laws and other conventions governing intellectual property. See the Office of Research website, http://www.uoguelph.ca/research/, for links to the University’s intellectual property policies.

2. Misrepresentation and Fraud

This category of offences covers a range of unacceptable activities, including the following:

  1. Impersonation
    Impersonation involves having someone impersonate oneself, either in person or electronically, in class, in an examination or in connection with any type of academic requirement, course assignment or material, or of availing oneself of the results of such impersonation. Both the impersonator and the individual impersonated (if aware of the impersonation) are subject to disciplinary proceedings under this policy.
  2. Falsification
    It is an offence to submit or present false or fraudulent assignments, research, credentials, or other documents for any academic purpose. This includes, but is not limited to:
    • falsified research or lab results and data;
    • concocting facts or reference;
    • false medical or compassionate certificates;
    • false letters of support or other letters of reference;
    • falsified academic records, transcripts or other registrarial records;
    • fraudulent submission practices (e.g., altering date stamps);
    • altering graded work for re-submission.
      It is also falsification to misrepresent the amount of work an individual has contributed to a group assignment or activity. Both the individual to whom work is falsely attributed and those who acquiesce in its attribution commit an academic offence.
  3. Withholding
    It is an offence to withhold records, transcripts or other academic documents with the intent to mislead or gain unfair academic advantage.
  4. Unauthorized Aids and Assistance
    It is an offence to use or possess an unauthorized aid, to use or obtain unauthorized assistance, or to use or obtain prohibited material in any academic examination or term test or in connection with any other form of academic work. Such aids or material may include, but are not limited to, specific documents, electronic equipment or devices, and commercial services (such as writing, editorial, software, or research survey services). Students should assume that any such aid is prohibited unless they are specifically advised otherwise by the instructor or invigilator. Note that unauthorized assistance does not include student support services offered by the University, such as the Learning Commons.

3. Improper Access and Obstruction

  1. Preventing Access to Materials
    It is an offence to alter, destroy, hide, remove without authorization, or in any other way improperly restrict access to library, electronic or other materials intended for general academic use.
  2. Obstruction and Interference
    It is an offence to obstruct or otherwise interfere with the scholarly activities of another, or to alter or falsify the work of others, in order to gain unfair academic advantage. This includes, but is not limited to, deleting data or files, interfering or tampering with experimental data, with a human or animal subject, with a written or other creation (for example, a painting, a sculpture, a film), with a chemical used for research, or with any other object of study or research device.
  3. Improper Access
    It is an offence to improperly obtain through theft, bribery, collusion, or otherwise access to confidential information, examinations or test questions or to gain undue academic advantage as a result of such behaviour.
  4. Improper Dissemination
    It is an offence to publish, disseminate or otherwise make public to a third party without prior written consent, confidential information. Confidential information includes but is not limited to academic information, data or documents which are not otherwise publicly available and which have been gathered or held with a reasonable expectation of confidentiality.

4. Aiding and Abetting

Knowingly aiding or abetting anyone in committing any form of academic misconduct is itself academic misconduct and subject to this policy.

Penalties

A. Range of Penalties That May be Assessed

If a student is found guilty of academic misconduct, an Official Warning will be given that an offence is now noted in the student’s record and that a subsequent offence will attract a more severe penalty. In addition, one or more of the following penalties may be assessed:

  1. A requirement for submission of a new or alternative piece of work.
  2. The rescinding of University-funded scholarships or bursaries.
  3. Partial or total loss of marks on the examination or assignment in which the offence occurred.
  4. Partial or total loss of marks for the course in which the offence occurred.
  5. Suspension from the University for a period of between one and six consecutive semesters. For the period of suspension, a student will not be permitted to register and will retain none of the privileges accorded to students with respect to right of access to University faculty, staff, facilities or services.
  6. A recommendation for expulsion from the University.
  7. A recommendation for revocation/rescinding of a degree. A person who is found guilty of academic misconduct after having been approved for graduation, or after having a degree conferred, may have the degree rescinded or revoked when, in the opinion of the dean, the offence, if detected, would have resulted in a sanction sufficiently severe that the degree would not have been granted at the time that it was.

B. Notes with Respect to Penalties

The following should be noted with respect to penalties:

  1. Senate has approved a set of Guidelines for the Assessment of Penalties for Academic Misconduct. These guidelines are used by chairs/directors and deans to assist them in determining appropriate penalties for individual cases. A copy of the guidelines can be found within this chapter under Penalties, or may be obtained from the Senate Office or the office of any chair or dean.
  2. Students who have been found guilty of a course-based offence and who have been assessed a penalty in addition to an Official Warning will not be permitted to drop the course, apply the Credit/No Credit Grading Option to the course, receive credit (CRD) standing on the course or to withdraw with failure. A student who has dropped the course prior to the offence(s) being detected will have their enrolment in the course reinstated if found guilty and if the penalty assessed is other than an Official Warning.
  3. Students who have been suspended for academic misconduct will not receive credit for any courses taken while under suspension. This policy applies to any credit course taken during the suspension period, be it distance, or non-campus, taken in open learning programs at the University of Guelph or at another post-secondary institution. In addition, in the case of graduate students, any research or writing completed during the suspension period may not be submitted in fulfillment of program requirements once the period of suspension is concluded.
  4. A student who wishes to be considered for readmission after a suspension must make an application that will be judged on the basis of eligibility to continue. A student who is suspended for academic misconduct and also fails to meet the continuation of study requirement will normally be required to serve the associated penalties consecutively.
  5. A student who has been expelled from the University of Guelph is not eligible for readmission to the University for at least five years. A student who wishes to be considered for readmission must petition the President to have the expulsion status removed. The President will form a hearing committee to review the case for lifting the admission restriction. If the committee decides to remove the expulsion status, the student who wishes to be considered for readmission must then make an application that will be judged on the basis of eligibility to continue. If the committee decides to leave the expulsion status in place, the student must wait at least another two years before submitting a new petition.
  6. Penalties may be applied retroactively if an offence is discovered subsequent to completion of a course or after graduation.

Procedures

A. Notes Re: Procedures and Authority to Act

  1. Deans may delegate their authority under this policy to an appropriate designate(s). Such delegation may be full (for example, all cases are delegated to an Associate Dean), or partial (for example, authority with respect to offences related to course work may be delegated to departmental chairs). Deans must provide the University’s Judicial Officer with the name(s) of individual(s) to whom authority has been delegated under this policy.
  2. For offences related to course work (including examinations):
    1. The designate or the Executive Director of Open Learning and Educational Support will carry out the role of the chair in cases where the offence has been committed in an Open Learning, non-degree credit course. Degree credit courses offered through distance are within the authority of the chair of the department offering the course. The role of the dean in the case of non-degree credit courses offered through the Open Learning program is carried out by the Executive Director of Open Learning and Educational Support.
    2. For undergraduate students and open learners, the relevant dean is the dean of the college in which the course is offered, and the dean of the college in which the student is enrolled (if different) should receive a copy of the decision. In the event that an offence is committed in a degree credit course by an open learner, the Executive Director of Open Learning and Educational Support should receive a copy of the decision.
    3. For graduate students, the relevant deans are the dean of the college in which the course is offered and the Dean of Graduate Studies acting jointly. The dean of the college in which the student is enrolled (if different) should receive a copy of the decision.
  3. For offences not related to courses, or for course offences involving students not enrolled in the course, for undergraduate students the dean of the college in which the student is enrolled is responsible for administering the policy. For graduate students, the policy is administered jointly by the Dean of Graduate Studies and the dean of the college in which the student is enrolled.
  4. In the event that a chair/director has a conflict of interest in dealing with a case, the dean will appoint another faculty member to deal with the case. In the event that a dean’s designate has a conflict of interest in dealing with a case, the dean may appoint an alternate designate or choose to deal with the case themselves. In the case of a conflict of interest on the part of a dean, the Provost will appoint a designate to deal with the case.
  5. Wherever in this policy it states that a student is to be contacted, the normal expectation is that such contact will be made using the student’s University of Guelph email account.

B. Detection and Documentation

  1. Examinations
    The responsibility for preventing and detecting academic misconduct in an examination lies with the invigilators, although they make use of reports from others to assist them in detection. In cases of suspected impersonation, the chief invigilator shall require the student concerned to remain after the examination until the student is satisfactorily identified. In other cases of suspected academic misconduct, the chief invigilator shall allow the student to complete the examination, but:
    • may require that the student complete the examination in another location or setting when it is deemed that such action will cause the least disruption of those taking the examination; and
    • shall confiscate any suspect material (including those portions of the examination completed to that point) and give it, along with the student’s other examination booklet(s) (collected at the end of the exam) to the instructor immediately following the examination.
    The chief invigilator shall give a full report, together with any confiscated material, to the instructor-in-charge of the course if the instructor is not the chief invigilator. In instances of open learning courses, the material will be submitted to the Executive Director of Open Learning and Educational Support . The student is required to contact the instructor no later than the end of the examination period.
  2. Term assignments, including research and thesis work
    The initial responsibility for detecting academic misconduct on term assignments, etc., necessarily lies with the person(s) responsible for evaluation and discussion of the student’s work, although that person may make use of reports from others to assist in detection, and may make use of electronic means of detection appropriate to the discipline. Where academic misconduct is suspected, the evaluator/marker shall retain possession of any suspect material and give a full report in writing together with any confiscated material to the instructor-in-charge of the course, or to the student’s advisor, if the instructor/advisor is not the evaluator/marker. At this stage, the student will be informed by the instructor/advisor that a suspicion of academic misconduct is being investigated.
  3. Cases outside the domain of examinations or assignments
    The responsibility for detecting academic misconduct in the context of an academic environment that is not part of the formal examination or assignment process rests with the entire University community. Where academic misconduct is suspected, but where it is unclear whether it is directly related to a specific course, or where the specific course is unknown, those with knowledge of an offence should contact the dean of the college in which the student is enrolled and the Dean of Graduate Studies in the case of a graduate student. If the suspected offence appears to be related to a specific course, then the instructor of the course should be contacted.

C. Investigation and Judgment

  1. Offences Related to Course Work, Research, Thesis Work or Examinations
    1. When an instructor or an advisor suspects that an academic offence has been committed, they are responsible for gathering evidence to support or allay the suspicion and may invite the student to meet with them to discuss the concerns. The instructor/advisor should pursue the gathering of evidence in a timely way. The normal expectation for assignments due within the semester is that instructors/advisors will complete their evidence gathering within ten working days of the due date for the assignment. For assignments submitted at the end of the semester or during the examination period, the instructor has until the tenth day of the subsequent semester to collect the evidence and determine whether to pursue a case. In a case where an instructor/advisor requires substantial additional time to collect and review the evidence, they may seek an extension of time from the chair.
    2. If after reviewing the available evidence the instructor/advisor believes an offence may have been committed, they shall refer the case to the chair of the department responsible for the course or graduate program. The referral document will include all evidentiary material collected by the instructor/advisor along with the transmittal form on which the instructor/advisor may include a recommendation with respect to penalty should the allegation be upheld. A copy of the first page of the transmittal form shall be sent to Enrolment Services/Office of Graduate Studies by the chair.
    3. If the chair believes that there is sufficient evidence to support a charge of academic misconduct, they will forward the transmittal form and all evidentiary material to the dean/dean's designate, normally within ten working days of receipt of the allegation from the instructor/advisor.
    4. Normally within ten working days of receipt of the case from the chair, the dean will invite the student to meet with them to discuss the allegation(s). If the student does not respond within ten working days to the request for an interview, or if the student refuses to attend an interview, the dean may proceed with the case. The student may be accompanied at the meeting by a support person. Prior to meeting with the student, the dean may consult with any individuals they believe is pertinent to the case. At the meeting, the student will be presented with the evidence collected by the dean to that point. Based on the student's response to the evidence, the dean may engage in further consultation with any individuals deemed pertinent to the case. The student will be informed of any other evidence gathered as a result of those consultations and be given an opportunity to respond prior to the dean's reaching a decision on the case
    5. If after weighing the available evidence the dean finds an offence has been committed, the dean will contact Enrolment Services/Office of Graduate Studies as appropriate to determine whether this is a first offence.
    6. In determining the appropriate penalty, the dean will consult the Guidelines for Penalties for Academic Misconduct, will take into consideration the recommendation from the instructor/advisor, and consider such factors as the relative weight of the assignment, the semester level of the student, any record of previous offences, the seriousness of the offence (e.g. the amount of work plagiarized), and any mitigating circumstances presented by the student. For graduate students, attention will also be paid to whether the work in which the offence has been committed is one of the major milestones of the graduate program (e.g., qualifying examination, thesis).
    7. Normally within ten working days of the meeting with the student, or ten days from the date of the final communication with the student with respect to any additional evidence, the dean will inform the student in writing of the disposition of the case. In a case where the dean requires substantial additional time to review the evidence and come to a judgment, they may seek an extension of time from the Provost.
      Should the dean determine that an academic offence has not been committed, they shall so inform the student, the instructor/advisor and the chair in writing. A copy of the letter will be forwarded to Enrolment Services/Office of Graduate Studies as appropriate. Thereafter, the complaint shall have no official status as an accusation of academic misconduct and no record of the complaint shall be maintained on the student's record.1
      Should the dean determine that an academic offence has been committed, the student shall be informed in writing. The written notification should include the offence for which the student has been found guilty and information with respect to penalty. Copies of the written notification should be sent to any other relevant dean(s) office(s), to the instructor/advisor, the department chair, the program counsellor and to Enrolment Services/Office of Graduate Studies (as appropriate).
    8. In a case where the dean believes suspension or a recommendation for expulsion/revocation is warranted, they should consult with the Provost and Vice-President Academic before making a final determination with respect to penalty.
    9. Should the dean recommend expulsion or revocation/rescinding of a degree, they shall so inform the student in writing and forward the matter to the Senate Committee on Student Petitions.
      At that time, the student may appeal the recommendation of expulsion/revocation and request a hearing of the Senate Committee on Student Petitions. Whether or not a hearing is requested, the Senate Committee on Student Petitions will proceed with the case and inform the parties involved of its decision.
      In the case of an expulsion, the Senate Committee on Student Petitions may decide to uphold the recommendation to expel, in which case the recommendation will be forwarded to the President for final decision. Alternatively, the Senate Committee on Student Petitions may decide to impose a lesser penalty, in which case the President's assent is not required. When a recommendation is referred to the President, the President may uphold the recommendation to expel or impose a lesser penalty, which will be final.
      In the case of revocation/rescinding of a degree, if the Senate Committee on Student Petitions confirms the recommendation of rescinding/revocation of a degree, the recommendation will be forwarded to the President. If the President does not confirm the recommendation of rescinding/revocation of a degree, the President may impose a lesser penalty, which will be final. If the President confirms the recommendation, the recommendation will be forwarded to Senate for final decision with respect to revocation/rescinding. If the Senate does not confirm the recommendation of revocation/rescinding, the matter will be returned to the President for a final decision with respect to a lesser penalty.
  2. Other Offences
    1. Cases involving offences that are not course-related or are not related to graduate program work are dealt with by the relevant dean (see Procedures A. Notes Re: Procedures and Authority to Act). Examples of such offences include, but are not limited to falsification of credentials for admission purposes, damaging of library materials, abetting the cheating of another in a course in which the abettor is not enrolled, and obstructing or interfering with the academic activities of others.
    2. When a case is brought to the attention of the dean, the dean shall inform the student that an allegation has been made and invite the student to meet to discuss the allegation. The dean will also inform Enrolment Services/Office of Graduate Studies (as appropriate). If the student does not respond within ten working days to the request for an interview or refuses to attend an interview, the dean may proceed with the case. The student may be accompanied at the meeting by a support person. Prior to meeting with the student, the dean may meet with any individuals or collect evidence as deemed pertinent to the case. At the meeting, the student will be presented with the evidence collected by the dean to that point. Based on the student's response to the evidence, if necessary the dean may consult with any other individuals deemed pertinent to the case. The student will be informed of any other evidence gathered as a result of those consultations and be given an opportunity to respond prior to the dean's reaching a decision on the case.
    3. If after weighing the available evidence the dean finds that an offence has been committed, the dean will contact Enrolment Services/Office of Graduate Studies as appropriate to determine whether this is a first offence. The dean may impose penalties in accordance with Penalties A. and B., above. In the event that the dean believes suspension, expulsion or revocation to be warranted, they shall proceed as in Procedures C.1. (h) and (i).
    4. Normally within ten days of meeting with the student, or of the final communication with the student with respect to evidence, the dean shall inform the student in writing of the decision in the case, and copy the letter to the relevant university officials, including Enrolment Services/Office of Graduate Studies (as appropriate). In a case where the dean requires substantial additional time to gather evidence and make a judgment, they may seek an extension from the Provost and Vice-President Academic.
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A statistical record will be kept by the Office of the Dean for annual reporting purposes.

Appeals

  1. Students may appeal either the finding, the penalty, or both to the Senate Student Petitions Committee.
  2. Appeals must be submitted to the Senate Student Petitions Committee within 10 working days of receipt of the decision. If the decision is mailed, it will be deemed to have been received by the student the fifth day after it has been mailed. If the decision is sent by courier, fax or email it shall be deemed to have been received one day after it has been sent.
  3. An appeal to the Senate Committee on Student Petitions involves an examination of all relevant documents and evidence to determine the appropriateness of a finding of guilt or of the assessed penalty. The procedures for conducting an appeal and for holding a hearing are set out in the Bylaws of the Senate Committee on Student Petitions. Following an appeal or hearing, the Senate Committee on Student Petitions may take one or more of the following courses of action:
    1. confirm a finding of guilt;
    2. reverse a finding of guilt (in which case no penalty shall apply);
    3. confirm a penalty;
    4. assess a different penalty.

Record of Academic Misconduct

Enrolment Services, or the Assistant VP of Graduate Studies, or the Executive Director of Open Learning and Educational Support as appropriate, shall place in the student's file a record of all academic misconduct for which the student is penalized. Students in the Associate Diploma Program who are found guilty of academic misconduct in an Independent Study course taken through OAC Access towards their Associate Diploma will have the record of the finding of guilt placed against the appropriate term.

The record of academic misconduct shall be expunged from the student's file upon graduation, or for open learners, upon completion of a certificate or diploma. Students who do not graduate from the University of Guelph or another university may submit an application to the Senate Committee on Student Petitions to have the record expunged no sooner than five years after the date of last registration. Students who have graduated at another accredited university may submit verification of graduation to Enrolment Services/Office of Graduate Studies and have their record expunged. The record for expulsion is permanent, unless removed by petition to the President.

Access to the record of academic misconduct will be limited to those involved in processing appeals and those involved in processing additional complaints against the student.

Guidelines for Penalties for Academic Misconduct

With the finding of academic misconduct, there is a mandatory penalty of Official Warning which will stay on the student’s record until graduation. In addition, one or more other penalties may be assessed. Following are guidelines used by chairs/directors and deans in determining the appropriate additional penalties. Users need to be aware that these are guidelines and that not all cases will fit neatly into the categories.

The guidelines below provide a range of penalties (minima and maxima) for the various offences identified in the Policy on Academic Misconduct as well as indicate what penalty is deemed to be the “norm” for the offence in the case of a first or second year student. It should be noted that “subsequent offence” means any subsequent offence, not only a subsequent offence in the same category.

For a course-based offence, the chair/director may assign penalties up to and including loss of grades if the offence is a first offence. If there is a previous offence on the student’s record, or if the chair/director believes a stronger penalty is merited, the case is forwarded to the dean for penalty assessment.

In cases where the dean is of the opinion that there is cause for a penalty different from those indicated in the guidelines (either higher or lower), they will review the penalty with the Provost and Vice-President Academic. The dean will also consult with the Provost in cases where the contemplated penalty is suspension or expulsion.

In a case where the dean is of the opinion that the finding of guilt is not supported by the evidence, the dean will review the case with the chair/director. If the chair/director and dean are unable to reach an agreement on the case, the dean will consult with the Provost before making final determinations as to the finding of guilt and any penalty to be applied in the event that dean upholds the finding of guilt.

In determining the appropriate penalty the chair/director or dean will take into consideration these guidelines, the recommendation from the instructor, the recommendation from the chair/director (in the case of a dean assigning a penalty), and any other relevant factors such as the relative weight of the assignment, the semester level of the student, the seriousness or extent of the offence (e.g. the amount of work plagiarized), any record of previous offences, and any mitigating circumstances presented by the student.

Guidelines for Penalties for Academic Misconduct in Addition to Official Warning

A. Misappropriation of Other's Work

In the tables below (N) indicates the normal expectation for penalty for a first or second year undergraduate, or first year graduate student.

1. Plagiarism

Misappropriation of Other’s Work - Plagiarism

Offences First Offence Subsequent Offences
Minor Resubmission of new work, Loss of grades (N), Zero on the assignment Loss of grades, Zero on the assignment (N), Zero in the course, Loss of scholarship/bursary, Suspension
Major Zero in the course (N), Loss of scholarship/bursary, Suspension Zero in the course, Loss of scholarship/bursary, Suspension (N), Expulsion/Revocation

2. Copying

Misappropriation of Other’s Work - Copying

Offences First Offence Subsequent Offences
Minor Resubmission of new work, Loss of grades (N), Zero on the assignment Loss of grades, Zero on the assignment (N), Zero in the course, Loss of scholarship/bursary, Suspension
Major Zero in the course (N), Loss of scholarship/bursary, Suspension Zero in the course, Loss of scholarship/bursary, Suspension (N), Expulsion/Revocation

3. Unauthorized Collaboration

Misappropriation of Other’s Work - Unauthorized Collaboration

Offences First Offence Subsequent Offences
Minor Resubmission of work, Loss of grades (N), Zero on the assignment Loss of grades, Zero on the assignment (N), Zero in the course, Loss of scholarship/bursary, Suspension
Major Zero in the course (N), Loss of scholarship/bursary, Suspension Zero in the course, Loss of scholarship/bursary, Suspension (N), Expulsion/Revocation

B. Misrepresentation and Fraud

1. Impersonation

Misrepresentation and Fraud - Impersonation

Offences First Offence Subsequent Offences
Minor Zero on the assignment (N), Zero in the course, Loss of scholarship/bursary, Suspension Zero in the course (N), Loss of scholarship/bursary, Suspension
Major Zero in the course, Loss of scholarship/bursary, Suspension (N) Zero in the course, Loss of scholarship/bursary, Suspension, Expulsion/Revocation (N)

2. Falsification

In addition to any penalty that may be applied, if a document is discovered to have been falsified, the document is null and void and the action permitted by the document is reversed.

If the falsified document is course-related (e.g. medical note) a zero in the course is the normal expectation for penalty for a first offence.

Misrepresentation and Fraud - Falsification

Offences First Offence Subsequent Offences
Minor and Major Resubmission of work, Loss of grades, Zero on the assignment, Zero in the course (N), Loss of scholarship/bursary, Suspension/revocation of admission offer Zero in the course, Loss of scholarship/bursary, Suspension/revocation of admission offer (N), Expulsion/Revocation

3. Withholding of documents

If the withheld information would have affected admission to a course then a zero in the course is the normal expectation for penalty for a minor subsequent offence.

Misrepresentation and Fraud - Withholding of documents

Offences First Offence Subsequent Offences
Minor Official warning (N), Loss of grades, Resubmission of work, Zero on the assignment Zero in the course (N), Loss of scholarship/bursary, Suspension (N), Expulsion/Revocation of degree or admission offer
Major Zero in the course, Loss of scholarship/bursary, Suspension, Expulsion/Revocation of degree or admission offer (N) Zero in the course, Loss of scholarship/bursary, Suspension, Expulsion/Revocation of degree or admission offer (N)

4. Unauthorized Aids

Misrepresentation and Fraud - Unauthorized Aids

Offences First Offence Subsequent Offences
Minor and Major Resubmission of work, Loss of grades, Zero on the assignment/exam (N) Zero in the course, Loss of scholarship/bursary, Suspension (N), Expulsion/Revocation

C. Improper Access and Obstruction

These offences may also be subject to penalty under the Policy on Non-Academic Misconduct.

1. Preventing Access

Improper Access and Obstruction - Preventing Access

Offences First Offence Subsequent Offences
Minor Official warning (N), Resubmission of work, Loss of grades, Zero on the assignment Zero in the course (N), Loss of scholarship/bursary, Suspension
Major Zero in the course (N), Loss of scholarship/bursary, Suspension Zero in the course, Loss of scholarship/bursary, Suspension (N), Expulsion/Revocation

2. Obstruction and Interference

Improper Access and Obstruction - Obstruction and Interference

Offences First Offence Subsequent Offences
Minor and Major Loss of grades, Zero on the assignment, Zero in the course, Loss of scholarship/bursary, Suspension (N) Zero in the course, Loss of scholarship/bursary, Suspension, Expulsion/Revocation (N)

3. Improper Access

Improper Access and Obstruction - Improper Access

Offences First Offence Subsequent Offences
Minor and Major Zero in the course, Loss of scholarship/bursary, Suspension (N), Expulsion/Revocation Zero in the course, Loss of scholarship/bursary, Suspension, Expulsion/Revocation (N)

4. Improper Dissemination

Improper Access and Obstruction - Improper Dissemination

Offences First Offence Subsequent Offences
Minor and Major Zero in the course (if applicable), Suspension (N) Zero in the course, Loss of scholarship/bursary, Suspension (N), Expulsion/Revocation