Philosophy (PHIL)

PHIL*1000  Classic Thinkers  Fall Only  (LEC: 3)  [0.50]  

This course will deal with enduring philosophical questions through an exploration of primary texts in the history of philosophy. Topics covered may include the nature of knowledge and the different types of knowledge, the relationship between the mind and the body, and the nature of good and evil. Texts and topics will vary with the instructor; students are advised to consult the Philosophy department's website.

Department(s): Department of Philosophy  
Location(s): Guelph  
PHIL*1010  Introductory Philosophy: Social and Political Issues  Fall and Winter  (LEC: 3)  [0.50]  

This course introduces philosophy through an examination of important issues in politics and society, such as punishment, animal rights, discrimination, war and violence, equality and property. These issues may be introduced through contemporary or historical philosophical writings.

Department(s): Department of Philosophy  
Location(s): Guelph  
PHIL*1030  Sex, Love, and Friendship  Fall and Winter  (LEC: 3)  [0.50]  

This course introduces students to philosophical inquiry through the careful study of the forms of interpersonal relationships. Issues central to friendship, love, and sexuality which may be addressed include pleasure, happiness, responsibility, power and oppression, gender, marriage and morality.

Department(s): Department of Philosophy  
Location(s): Guelph  
PHIL*1050  Ethics, Knowledge, and Reality  Winter Only  (LEC: 3)  [0.50]  

This course introduces students to philosophy through the exploration of basic perennial philosophical problems and questions, such as whether there is free will, a God, objective right and wrong, genuine knowledge of the world, and other topics. The readings for the course will consist primarily of 20th century philosophical writing.

Department(s): Department of Philosophy  
Location(s): Guelph  
PHIL*2000  Philosophy of Biology  Winter Only  (LEC: 3)  [0.50]  

This course focuses on philosophical issues that arise within biology, such as the explanation of altruism, the question of whether species are real, and the challenge of how to identify adaptations. The course also examines philosophical issues that arise at the interface between biology and society, such as the implications of evolutionary theory for traditional views about human nature, or the proper role for scientists in advocating for environmental policies.

Prerequisite(s): 2.00 credits including 0.50 credits in BIOL  
Restriction(s): This is a Priority Access Course. Some restrictions may apply during some time periods.  
Department(s): Department of Philosophy  
Location(s): Guelph  
PHIL*2030  Philosophy of Medicine  Fall Only  (LEC: 3)  [0.50]  

Medicine is a philosophical, not merely a practical, empirical enterprise. This course covers philosophical concepts which are widely used to evaluate health and health-practices that include: autonomy, consent, mind, will, rights, harm, fairness, dignity, truth and even `health' itself. Issues central to health and health care practice include: the nature of professional-client relationships, genetic counseling, passive and active euthanasia, pharmacology and behaviour modification, resource allocation, and the special set of issues raised by reproductive technologies.

Prerequisite(s): 2.00 credits or (1 of PHIL*1000, PHIL*1010, PHIL*1050)  
Department(s): Department of Philosophy  
Location(s): Guelph  
PHIL*2060  Philosophy of Feminism I  Winter Only  (LEC: 3)  [0.50]  

This course examines metaphysical, epistemological and ethical issues in feminist philosophy, including such topics as the nature and consequences of patriarchy, human nature, sexual divisions of labour, women's studies, rationalizations of inequalities and explorations into a contemporary feminist agenda for social, political and economic changes.

Offering(s): Also offered through Distance Education format.  
Prerequisite(s): 2.00 credits or (1 of PHIL*1000, PHIL*1010, PHIL*1050)  
Department(s): Department of Philosophy  
Location(s): Guelph  
PHIL*2070  Philosophy of the Environment  Winter Only  (LEC: 3)  [0.50]  

Environmental Philosophy asks questions such as: How has `nature' been conceptualized in the Western philosophical tradition, in aesthetics, science, and ethics? What arguments have been offered for the view that humans are superior among creatures? What connections might there be between the ways that nature, humankind, and animals have been conceptualized and the ways that humans have tended to act toward the non-human natural environment? This course may cover such topics as: climate change, resource extraction and justice, biotechnology, obligations to future generations, risk assessment and discount rates, species lost, conservation vs. preservation.

Offering(s): Also offered through Distance Education format.  
Prerequisite(s): 2.00 credits or (1 of PHIL*1000, PHIL*1010, PHIL*1050)  
Department(s): Department of Philosophy  
Location(s): Guelph  
PHIL*2080  Animals in Philosophy  Summer Only  (LEC: 3)  [0.50]  

This course will examine the concept of the animal itself, the nature of animal minds, the importance of species membership, and the relationship between human and non-human animals. It will discuss applied issues related to animal welfare, wildlife, agriculture, experimentation, and the environment. It will also explore some of the ethical, social, political and feminist perspectives on animals as they are addressed by philosophers. As such, the course aims to enable students to analyze growing concerns that animals play in our lives.

Offering(s): Offered through Distance Education format only.  
Prerequisite(s): 2.00 credits or (1 of PHIL*1000, PHIL*1010, PHIL*1050)  
Department(s): Department of Philosophy  
Location(s): Guelph  
PHIL*2100  Critical Thinking  Fall and Winter  (LEC: 3)  [0.50]  

This course is designed to develop clarity of thought and method in the analysis and construction of arguments. By contrast to PHIL*2110, the emphasis here is upon informal principles of critical thinking and arguments stated in terms of ordinary language. Topics include the nature and methods of arguing, classification, definition and fallacies.

Prerequisite(s): 2.00 credits or (1 of PHIL*1000, PHIL*1010, PHIL*1050)  
Department(s): Department of Philosophy  
Location(s): Guelph  
PHIL*2110  Formal Logic  Winter Only  (LEC: 3)  [0.50]  

This course studies the basic principles and techniques of formal logic. The analysis of the logical structure of sentences and arguments is explored, together with the fundamental principles of elementary sentential logic and quantification.

Prerequisite(s): 2.00 credits or (1 of PHIL*1000, PHIL*1010, PHIL*1050)  
Department(s): Department of Philosophy  
Location(s): Guelph  
PHIL*2120  Ethics  Fall and Winter  (LEC: 3)  [0.50]  

Philosophical ethics is the attempt to systematize, explain, and justify the standards by which we evaluate our conduct as persons. The course may include treatment of controversial ethical issues such as abortion, euthanasia, war, and the treatment of animals and will cover many of the following questions: can we expect to find a single, universal code of ethics that applies to all human beings, or do such codes vary for each society or even for each individual? What are the roles of reason and emotion in ethics? Is morality grounded on a principle, and if so, what is it? Are there any traits of character that one must have to be a good person? Given that traditional ethical codes have been almost universally sexist, how must ethics be refashioned in order for women to achieve equal recognition?

Offering(s): Also offered through Distance Education format.  
Prerequisite(s): 2.00 credits or (1 of PHIL*1000, PHIL*1010, PHIL*1050)  
Department(s): Department of Philosophy  
Location(s): Guelph  
PHIL*2140  Ancient Greek Philosophy  Fall Only  (LEC: 3)  [0.50]  

A survey of the beginnings of Western philosophy, this course will focus on themes such as the nature of reality, the ways we might come to have knowledge, and the good life for human beings. This course will typically consider such thinkers as Socrates, Plato, Aristotle, and Epictetus, although the specific course content will vary with the instructor.

Prerequisite(s): 2.00 credits or (1 of PHIL*1000, PHIL*1010, PHIL*1030, PHIL*1050)  
Department(s): Department of Philosophy  
Location(s): Guelph  
PHIL*2160  Early Modern Philosophy: Reason vs. Experience  Winter Only  (LEC: 3)  [0.50]  

Philosophers of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries grappled with a central question regarding the foundation of human knowledge: Does knowledge arise from pure reasoning alone or from sensory experience? This question inspired debates regarding scepticism, the nature of reality, the connection between mind and body, language and meaning, moral certainty, and the relationship between religion and science, to name but a few.

Prerequisite(s): 2.00 credits or (1 of PHIL*1000, PHIL*1010, PHIL*1030, PHIL*1050)  
Department(s): Department of Philosophy  
Location(s): Guelph  
PHIL*2170  Existentialism  Fall Only  (LEC: 3)  [0.50]  

Existentialism is a philosophy built around the experience of human freedom. This course focuses on the character of the subject who makes choices, and on the personal and political responsibilities that attach to the making of decisions. The course will examine this and other themes associated with Existentialism through nineteenth and twentieth century representatives, which may include Kierkegaard, Sartre, de Beauvoir, Camus and others.

Offering(s): Offered in odd-numbered years.  
Prerequisite(s): 2.00 credits or (1 of PHIL*1000, PHIL*1010, PHIL*1050)  
Department(s): Department of Philosophy  
Location(s): Guelph  
PHIL*2180  Philosophy of Science  Fall Only  (LEC: 3)  [0.50]  

As a system of knowledge pursuit, science develops laws and theories to explain, predict, understand, and control empirical phenomena. This course introduces students to many of the challenging assumptions, foundations, and implications of science. Topics include the nature of scientific knowledge, the structure of scientific theories, the distinction between science and pseudo-science, whether there is a scientific method, and how social and political processes influence the way science develops.

Prerequisite(s): 2.00 credits or (1 of PHIL*1000, PHIL*1010, PHIL*1050)  
Department(s): Department of Philosophy  
Location(s): Guelph  
PHIL*2240  Knowledge and Belief  Fall Only  (LEC: 3)  [0.50]  

This course is an introduction to epistemology, which is the study of the nature, scope, and limits of knowledge. This course will examine a number of the central questions in epistemology, such as: what can we know? What is the nature of knowledge? And what is the difference between knowledge and true belief?

Prerequisite(s): 2.00 credits or (1 of PHIL*1000, PHIL*1010, PHIL*1030, PHIL*1050)  
Equate(s): PHIL*2250  
Department(s): Department of Philosophy  
Location(s): Guelph  
PHIL*2280  Key Concepts in Political Philosophy  Fall Only  (LEC: 3)  [0.50]  

This course presents an in-depth treatment of one or more key concepts in political philosophy. Among the many possible concepts that the course may address are those of freedom, equality, power, community, identity, autonomy, justice, rights, political obligation, representation, authority, legitimacy, exploitation, emancipation, and development. These concepts may be explored historically or through contemporary political and/or philosophical debates.

Prerequisite(s): 0.50 credits in either Philosophy or Political Science  
Restriction(s): POLS*2000  
Department(s): Department of Philosophy  
Location(s): Guelph  
PHIL*2370  Metaphysics and Mind  Winter Only  (LEC: 3)  [0.50]  

This course studies major theories of the nature of reality, and of issues and problems that arise in the investigation of fundamental features of the world. Texts read may be either historical or contemporary. Among possible topics explored in the course are materialism, free will, and determinism, the nature of time, and the position of consciousness in the world.

Prerequisite(s): 2.00 credits or (1 of PHIL*1000, PHIL*1010, PHIL*1030, PHIL*1050)  
Department(s): Department of Philosophy  
Location(s): Guelph  
PHIL*2600  Business and Professional Ethics  Winter Only  (LEC: 3)  [0.50]  

This course examines ethical and evaluative issues relating to business and professional practices, and is intended for students registered in a science or professional program, but without a background in philosophy. Topics to be explored include the nature of values and ethical systems, duties and rights, private and public goods, the consumer movement, social marketing, corporate social accounting, private right and professional responsibility.

Prerequisite(s): 2.00 credits or (1 of PHIL*1000, PHIL*1010, PHIL*1050)  
Department(s): Department of Philosophy  
Location(s): Guelph  
PHIL*3040  Philosophy of Law  Fall Only  (LEC: 3)  [0.50]  

This course is an introduction to the main topics in the philosophy of law. It aims to give students a philosophical grounding in such issues as the purpose and nature of law, the relationship between law and individual freedom and the question of international law. Thinkers studied may include St. Thomas Aquinas, John Stuart Mill and H.L.A. Hart. The course may also include an examination of the way in which controversial ethical and social issues are treated under the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms.

Prerequisite(s): 1.50 credits in Philosophy or 7.50 credits or PHIL*2120  
Department(s): Department of Philosophy  
Location(s): Guelph  
PHIL*3050  Philosophy of Art  Winter Only  (LEC: 3)  [0.50]  

This course considers various philosophical questions concerning art such as the nature of a work of art, the nature of beauty, the relationship between the artist and the audience, the task of the art critic, the social function of art.

Offering(s): Also offered through Distance Education format. Offered in even-numbered years.  
Prerequisite(s): 1.50 credits in Philosophy or 7.50 credits  
Department(s): Department of Philosophy  
Location(s): Guelph  
PHIL*3060  Medieval Philosophy  Winter Only  (LEC: 3)  [0.50]  

An overview of philosophical thought of the Middle Ages, that is, roughly of the period between 500 AD and 1500 AD. The course will focus on several themes from the Christian, Jewish and Islamic traditions to show that many of the philosophical concerns of the present day were also of concern to thinkers of the period. In particular, we will look at the relationship between knowledge and belief, the nature of human happiness, the question of whether God exists and, if so, whether his existence can be rationally demonstrated, and the problem of free will, among others. Thinkers to be discussed will generally include St. Augustine (354-430), St. Anselm (1033-1109), al-Farabi (ca. 850-ca. 950), Maimonides (1135-1204) and St. Thomas Aquinas (1224/25-1274).

Offering(s): Offered in odd-numbered years.  
Prerequisite(s): 1.50 credits in Philosophy or 7.50 credits  
Department(s): Department of Philosophy  
Location(s): Guelph  
PHIL*3100  Kant and His Legacy  Winter Only  (LEC: 3)  [0.50]  

This course offers an in-depth study of the philosophy of Immanuel Kant, one of the most influential figures in the history of philosophy. The course will include study of one or more of his major works. Kant's works may be studied on their own, or in conjunction with the study of works of later philosophers who were significantly influenced by Kant's philosophical ideas.

Prerequisite(s): 1.50 credits in Philosophy or 7.50 credits  
Restriction(s): PHIL*3080, PHIL*3090  
Department(s): Department of Philosophy  
Location(s): Guelph  
PHIL*3160  Metaphysics  Winter Only  (LEC: 3)  [0.50]  

A common way of thinking of the world is that it consists of objects with properties that persist through time while changing in different ways. Yet there are deep puzzles about each of these basic, seemingly indispensable concepts. What does it take to be an object? How much can an object change without becoming a different object? Are some of an object's properties essential to it? Metaphysics is the business of proposing and debating answers to these questions and related questions. This course introduces students to these debates.

Offering(s): Offered in odd-numbered years.  
Prerequisite(s): 1.50 credits in Philosophy or 7.50 credits  
Department(s): Department of Philosophy  
Location(s): Guelph  
PHIL*3170  Topics in the Philosophy of Science  Winter Only  (LEC: 3)  [0.50]  

This course studies specialized questions about science within a broad intellectual and social context. Contested issues regarding the nature of science, its aims and methods, and science's relation to society will be critically examined. Past offerings of the course have examined such topics as realism and antirealism, naturalized explanations, the unity/disunity of science, and feminist approaches to science.

Prerequisite(s): 1 of (1.50 credits in Philosophy, 7.50 credits, PHIL*2180)  
Department(s): Department of Philosophy  
Location(s): Guelph  
PHIL*3180  Philosophy of Mind  Fall Only  (LEC: 3)  [0.50]  

This course is a survey of central issues and positions in contemporary philosophy of mind. Topics may include: the nature of the mind and its relation with the brain; the puzzle of conscious experience; and the problem of mental content.

Offering(s): Offered in odd-numbered years.  
Prerequisite(s): 1.50 credits in Philosophy or 7.50 credits  
Department(s): Department of Philosophy  
Location(s): Guelph  
PHIL*3190  Epistemology  Fall Only  (LEC: 3)  [0.50]  

This course is an advanced introduction to the central issues in epistemology, such as the nature of knowledge and how it differs from mere true belief. Possible topics include skepticism, theories of justification and rationality, self-knowledge and the sources of belief.

Offering(s): Offered in odd-numbered years.  
Prerequisite(s): 1.50 credits in Philosophy or 7.50 credits  
Department(s): Department of Philosophy  
Location(s): Guelph  
PHIL*3200  Continental Philosophy  Fall Only  (LEC: 3)  [0.50]  

This course focuses on 20th century French and German philosophy and the influences that shaped it. The course will be part historical, part contemporary. The historical part may survey touchstones of current Continental thought in ancient and modern philosophy. The contemporary part of this course may focus on any of the hundred or so key figures in 20th or 21st century Continental thought, or groupings thereof according to particular thematic.

Prerequisite(s): 1.50 credits in Philosophy or 7.50 credits  
Department(s): Department of Philosophy  
Location(s): Guelph  
PHIL*3210  Women in the History of Philosophy  Fall Only  (LEC: 3)  [0.50]  

This course will examine selected works of women philosophers and their contributions to the major philosophical debates of their day. The philosophers covered may be drawn from any period in the history of philosophy, up to, and including, the 20th century and topics covered have ranged across feminist issues, epistemology, metaphysics, and ethics. Because texts and topics will vary with the instructor, students are advised to consult the departmental website.

Offering(s): Offered in odd-numbered years.  
Prerequisite(s): 1.50 credits in Philosophy or 7.50 credits  
Department(s): Department of Philosophy  
Location(s): Guelph  
PHIL*3230  Theories of Justice  Winter Only  (LEC: 3)  [0.50]  

This is a course in social and political philosophy is the area of philosophy concerned with the morality of major social institutions such as the state, the economy, and the family. This course may engage in the detailed examination of one or more of the following questions: what justifies the state's claim to authority? What are the proper dimensions of individual liberty? What levels of material and social equality are required for a society to be just? These questions will be pursued through reading historical and/or contemporary philosophical texts.

Prerequisite(s): 1.50 credits in Philosophy or 7.50 credits  
Department(s): Department of Philosophy  
Location(s): Guelph  
PHIL*3250  Philosophy of Language  Fall Only  (LEC: 3)  [0.50]  

This course will explore the relationship between human beings and language, and between language and the world. In particular, it may address such fundamental questions as: What is it about the way in which we use words that gives them the meanings they have? And what is the relationship between words and objects to which they refer? Authors studied may include representatives from the analytic and/or continental traditions in philosophy.

Offering(s): Offered in even-numbered years.  
Prerequisite(s): 1.50 credits in Philosophy or 7.50 credits  
Department(s): Department of Philosophy  
Location(s): Guelph  
PHIL*3260  Set Theory and Modal Logic  Unspecified  (LEC: 3)  [0.50]  

Both set theory and modal logic are important tools in contemporary philosophy. Set theory is about relationships among collections of things. Modal logic elaborates the notions of necessity and possibility in formal models of different possible worlds. Students will explore these topics by producing and understanding informal proofs of important facts, and by doing exercises developing understanding of the semantics of modal logic.

Prerequisite(s): PHIL*2110  
Restriction(s): PHIL*4110  
Department(s): Department of Philosophy  
Location(s): Guelph  
PHIL*3280  21st Century Philosophy  Fall Only  (LEC: 3)  [0.50]  

This course is an introduction to the most current philosophical texts and movements developed since the beginning of the 21st Century. Students will be taught to understand and work creatively with the most recent ideas in the discipline. Material covered will focus almost exclusively on the philosophical texts written in or after the year 2000.

Offering(s): Offered in odd-numbered years.  
Prerequisite(s): 1.50 credits in Philosophy or 7.50 credits  
Department(s): Department of Philosophy  
Location(s): Guelph  
PHIL*3290  Advanced Ethical Theory  Fall Only  (LEC: 3)  [0.50]  

This course focuses on the theoretical foundations of morality. Ethical theory comprises metaethics, which is primarily concerned with the objectivity of moral judgments; normative ethics, which is concerned with the principles of sound moral judgment, and moral psychology, which is concerned with moral motivation and moral reasoning.

Prerequisite(s): 1.50 credits in Philosophy or 7.50 credits  
Department(s): Department of Philosophy  
Location(s): Guelph  
PHIL*3300  Democracy and Its Critics  Fall Only  (LEC: 3)  [0.50]  

This course will review classical and contemporary positions on the nature and value of democracy, including arguments for and against it from a variety of stances in political philosophy. It will also examine the merits of competing models of democracy, issues dealing with limitations on majority rule in pluralistic societies, and the applicability of democracy in international contexts.

Offering(s): Offered in odd-numbered years.  
Prerequisite(s): 1.50 credits in Philosophy or 7.50 credits  
Department(s): Department of Philosophy  
Location(s): Guelph  
PHIL*3350  Selected Topics in Philosophy  Unspecified  (LEC: 3)  [0.50]  

The topics for this course will vary from one offering to the next, and will deal with material, such as Philosophy of History, Philosophy of Social Science and advanced Philosophy of Religion generally arising from the instructor's current research interests. This course gives students a chance to explore topics and texts not usually covered in other courses. Students are encouraged to consult the departmental website for course content and availability.

Prerequisite(s): 1.50 credits in Philosophy or 7.50 credits  
Department(s): Department of Philosophy  
Location(s): Guelph  
PHIL*3360  Nineteenth Century Philosophy  Fall Only  (LEC: 3)  [0.50]  

This course provides a survey of 19th century philosophy, a period of extreme change and upheaval, championed mainly by German thinkers. The course will engage with topics such as the nature of individual freedom; historical approaches to understanding concepts of reality and moral norms; proposed radical revisions to traditional moral and social order; and confronting the possible meaninglessness or absurdity of human life.

Offering(s): Offered in even-numbered years.  
Prerequisite(s): 1.50 credits in Philosophy or 7.50 credits  
Restriction(s): PHIL*3080, PHIL*3090  
Department(s): Department of Philosophy  
Location(s): Guelph  
PHIL*3370  Ethics of Artificial Intelligence  Winter Only  (LEC: 3)  [0.50]  

Artificial Intelligence (AI) increasingly touches all aspects of our lives, from our economy, healthcare systems, and food production down to our social interactions. This course will explore some of the real and possible implications of handing over decision-making power to machines. Some of the questions explored may include individual privacy, algorithmic bias, social inequality and AI, and the moral status, both in terms of agency and responsibility, of AI.

Department(s): Department of Philosophy  
Location(s): Guelph  
PHIL*3410  Major Texts in the History of Philosophy  Winter Only  (LEC: 3)  [0.50]  

This course will consider central and continuing philosophical issues through an exploration of primary texts in the history of philosophy. The readings and periods stressed will vary from year to year, but could cover significant and enduring texts from the ancient period right up to the 21st century. Texts and topics will vary with the instructor; students are advised to consult the Philosophy department's website.

Prerequisite(s): 1.50 credits in Philosophy or 7.50 credits  
Department(s): Department of Philosophy  
Location(s): Guelph  
PHIL*3450  Ethics in the Life Sciences  Winter Only  (LEC: 3)  [0.50]  

This course is an advanced introduction to the ethical implications of values and practices guiding research in the life sciences. Fields of discussion may include ethics in health care, genetics and human reproduction, environmental sciences, agriculture, animal husbandry, animal welfare, and food technologies. Material covered will be drawn from current books and articles by philosophers in this rapidly expanding area.

Prerequisite(s): 1.50 credits in Philosophy or 7.50 credits. PHIL*2120, PHIL*2180 are recommended.  
Department(s): Department of Philosophy  
Location(s): Guelph  
PHIL*3710  Directed Reading  Fall and Winter  (LEC: 3)  [0.50]  

This course is intended as an intensive course of reading chosen by the student in consultation with the faculty member.

Prerequisite(s): 1.50 credits in Philosophy or 7.50 credits  
Restriction(s): Instructor consent required.  
Department(s): Department of Philosophy  
Location(s): Guelph  
PHIL*3910  Indian Philosophy  Fall Only  (LEC: 3)  [0.50]  

This course provides an analysis of selected primary sources of Indian philosophy in translation, from the Vedic Upanishads to the "integral yoga" of Sri Aurobindo. Emphasis will be on the basic inspirational works of Hinduism and Buddhism, and their respective views on the ultimate nature of reality, the self, suffering, freedom, ignorance and enlightenment.

Offering(s): Offered in even-numbered years.  
Prerequisite(s): 1.50 credits in Philosophy or 7.50 credits  
Department(s): Department of Philosophy  
Location(s): Guelph  
PHIL*3920  Chinese Philosophy  Winter Only  (LEC: 3)  [0.50]  

This course analyzes selected primary sources of Chinese philosophy, in translation, from the I Ching to Mao Tse-tung. Emphasis will be on the foundational works of Confucianism, Taoism, Ch'an (or Zen) Buddhism, and Neo-Confucianism, concerning such issues as the ultimate nature of being, non-being and human destiny, proper government of the self, the family and society, and the principles and practice of enlightenment.

Offering(s): Offered in odd-numbered years.  
Prerequisite(s): 1.50 credits in Philosophy or 7.50 credits  
Department(s): Department of Philosophy  
Location(s): Guelph  
PHIL*4040  Advanced Philosophy of the Environment  Unspecified  (LEC: 3)  [0.50]  

This course is an exploration in detail of central debates in environmental philosophy. Possible topics include: genetic modification of plants and animals, duties to future generations, obligations to distant global others, the ethics of encounters, animal welfare, trans-species communication, restoration and conservation projects, aesthetics, virtue ethics and stewardship.

Prerequisite(s): (PHIL*1010 or PHIL*2120), PHIL*2070  
Department(s): Department of Philosophy  
Location(s): Guelph  
PHIL*4060  Philosophy of Feminism II  Unspecified  (LEC: 3)  [0.50]  

This course is an advanced study of problems in feminist philosophy. The course may cover specific topics or the work of one or more feminist philosophers. Topics may be drawn from feminist ethics, epistemology, and/or postmodernism. Texts and topics will vary with the instructor; students are advised to consult the Philosophy department's website.

Prerequisite(s): 1.00 credits in Philosophy at the 3000 level or PHIL*2060  
Department(s): Department of Philosophy  
Location(s): Guelph  
PHIL*4120  Current Debates in Language and Mind  Unspecified  (LEC: 3)  [0.50]  

Each offering of this course will focus on a specific issue or set of related issues that are now being debated in Philosophy of mind and Philosophy of language. Readings will be contemporary works.

Prerequisite(s): 1.00 credits in Philosophy at the 3000 level or 12.50 credits  
Department(s): Department of Philosophy  
Location(s): Guelph  
PHIL*4130  Current Debates in Continental Philosophy  Unspecified  (LEC: 3)  [0.50]  

Each offering of this course will focus on close study of either one or two figures of contemporary relevance in discussions of Continental European philosophy, or a specific issue or set of related issues that are now being debated in that field.

Prerequisite(s): 1.00 credits in Philosophy at the 3000 level or 12.50 credits  
Department(s): Department of Philosophy  
Location(s): Guelph  
PHIL*4140  Current Debates in Philosophy of Science  Unspecified  (LEC: 3)  [0.50]  

Each offering of this course will focus on a specific issue or set of related issues that are now being debated in Philosophy of Science. Readings will be contemporary works.

Prerequisite(s): 1.00 credits in Philosophy at the 3000 level or 12.50 credits  
Department(s): Department of Philosophy  
Location(s): Guelph  
PHIL*4160  Philosophy Field Course  Fall Only  (LEC: 3)  [1.00]  

This variable content course addresses an issue which is relevant to the contemporary world from a range of philosophical perspectives. The course is built on research into the issue, including material gathered during a 1-2 week field trip which is held in the summer immediately preceding the semester in which the student takes the course. The field trip is a mandatory component of the course, one for which the student assumes the costs of transportation, food and lodging.

Offering(s): Offered in even-numbered years.  
Prerequisite(s): 13.00 credits and a minimum cumulative average of 70%.  
Restriction(s): Restricted to students in Philosophy major or minor. Instructor consent required.  
Department(s): Department of Philosophy  
Location(s): Guelph  
PHIL*4230  Current Debates in Social and Political Philosophy  Unspecified  (LEC: 3)  [0.50]  

This is an advanced level course that examines in detail selected historical or contemporary treatments of specific issues in social and political philosophy.

Prerequisite(s): 1.00 credits in Philosophy at the 3000 level or 12.50 credits  
Department(s): Department of Philosophy  
Location(s): Guelph  
PHIL*4310  Applied Ethics  Unspecified  (LEC: 3)  [0.50]  

An advanced study of specific problems in applied ethics. This is an intensive course designed for philosophy majors as well as for seventh and eighth semester students who have had no previous philosophy course.

Department(s): Department of Philosophy  
Location(s): Guelph  
PHIL*4340  Current Debates in Ethics  Unspecified  (LEC: 3)  [0.50]  

This course offers an advanced study of problems in ethical theory. This course will examine contemporary and perennial issues in ethics through recent or historical texts. Texts and topics will vary with the instructor; students are advised to consult the Philosophy department's website.

Prerequisite(s): 1.00 credits in Philosophy at the 3000 level or 12.50 credits  
Department(s): Department of Philosophy  
Location(s): Guelph  
PHIL*4360  Current Debates in Epistemology  Unspecified  (LEC: 3)  [0.50]  

An examination of central problems concerning the nature of knowledge. In some offerings the selection will emphasize problems in the Philosophy of Language.

Prerequisite(s): 1 of (1.00 credits in Philosophy at the 3000 level, 12.50 credits, PHIL*3190)  
Department(s): Department of Philosophy  
Location(s): Guelph  
PHIL*4370  Current Debates in Metaphysics  Unspecified  (LEC: 3)  [0.50]  

An advanced study of problems concerning the nature of reality.

Prerequisite(s): 1.00 credits in Philosophy at the 3000 level or 12.50 credits  
Department(s): Department of Philosophy  
Location(s): Guelph  
PHIL*4410  Major Texts in Philosophy  Unspecified  (LEC: 3)  [0.50]  

Advanced study of a major text in philosophy not treated in either PHIL*4400 or PHIL*4420.

Prerequisite(s): 1.00 credits in Philosophy at the 3000 level  
Department(s): Department of Philosophy  
Location(s): Guelph  
PHIL*4420  Major Texts in Philosophy  Unspecified  (LEC: 3)  [0.50]  

Advanced study of a major text in philosophy not treated in either PHIL*4400 or PHIL*4410.

Prerequisite(s): 1.00 credits in Philosophy at the 3000 level  
Department(s): Department of Philosophy  
Location(s): Guelph  
PHIL*4710  Directed Reading  Fall and Winter  (LEC: 3)  [0.50]  

This course is intended as an intensive course of reading chosen by the student in consultation with the faculty member.

Prerequisite(s): 1.00 credits in Philosophy at the 3000-level  
Restriction(s): Instructor consent required.  
Department(s): Department of Philosophy  
Location(s): Guelph  
PHIL*4720  Directed Reading  Fall and Winter  (LEC: 3)  [0.50]  

This course is intended as an intensive course of reading chosen by the student in consultation with the faculty member.

Prerequisite(s): 1.00 credits in Philosophy at the 3000-level  
Restriction(s): Instructor consent required.  
Department(s): Department of Philosophy  
Location(s): Guelph  
PHIL*4800  Honours Philosophy Research Paper I  Unspecified  (LEC: 3)  [0.50]  

The preparation of a major research paper under the supervision of a faculty member. Normally open only to 7th semester honours philosophy students.

Prerequisite(s): 1.00 credits in Philosophy at the 3000 level  
Restriction(s): Instructor consent required.  
Department(s): Department of Philosophy  
Location(s): Guelph  
PHIL*4820  Philosophy Research Presentation  Fall and Winter  (LEC: 3)  [0.50]  

The focus of this course is mastering the oral presentation of a philosophical argument, and engaging in respectful, intellectually honest discussion with one's audience. Students will develop and present a philosophical claim which they will explain and defend during a question period after the presentation. Students are expected to have topic for their presentation at the beginning of the course.

Prerequisite(s): 14.00 credits including 1.00 credits in Philosophy at the 3000-level  
Restriction(s): Restricted to students in Philosophy major.  
Department(s): Department of Philosophy  
Location(s): Guelph